Monday, 23 January 2006

Becoming an analyst, getting it right and being paid for it!

The analyst landscape never ends surprising us, whether it’s consolidating or expanding is like asking the same but about the Universe. There is without any doubt a polarisation, with the Gartner Borg holding over 50% market share and on the other end independent analysts who keep spinning-off (is it like a water cycle really?) but struggle financially.
James started a series of notes to encourage new competitors: read How To Become An Industry Analyst part 1, part 2 and part 3.
In a nutshell, you need to have a passion for learning (always useful not to fall asleep at chart 78 during a vendor telebriefing), blog, declare (tag yourself) as an analyst, The best quote of all is this one:

  • “There is no qualification or examination you take in order to become become an industry analyst.”

Indeed.

The only things James did not say, are what do analysts DO (apart from blogging) and how do they make a living. Futile issues probably.

On another note and as the Borg members are back from their research retreat in Disneyworld, we have received confirmed intelligence that they will push their prices even further up. In the meantime, their web site will be “portalised” to offer views tailored to individuals’ research need. No words yet on a much needed “desilo-sation” though…

Links:

3 comments:

james governor said...

what we do? why analyse stuff of course.

David Rossiter said...

The question "what does an analyst do?" is something I keep asking myself. What makes people an industry analyst by definition rather than a marketing consultant or a market researcher? How does an analyst's job differ? Sometimes , with some firms, the difference isn't all that clear...

Duncan Chapple said...

I think the clear difference is that industry analysts are not only primarily engaged in producing and discussing analysis, but also largely follow their own research agenda. Market researchers and consultants typically work on individual projects that are each commercially sponsored.